The fart dilemma.

When you notice it, it is usually too late ... for everyone! Flatulence is embarrassing and there is probably not a single person on this earth who has not already felt embarrassed by a gassy stomach. Despite its musty reputation, there is no need to worry. 10-20 farts a day are completely normal.So while alittle unwanted accident here and there might feel embarrassing, persistent gas and a bloated stomach are actually stressful and often painful disturbing factors. Both derive from increased gas formation in your gut.

But why does this happen and what can you do about it? During digestion, fermentation processes take place in our intestines. As with any fermentation, gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen are produced. Most of them are absorbed by tiny blood vessels in the intestine and carried away through the lungs. This happens discreetly odorless. A small remainder of the gases escapes in the other direction and comes out as what we know as a fart.

If more gases are formed than usual, more of these so-called intestinal winds also occur - the result: frequent intense flatulence and even painful bloating. Those affected feel uncomfortable, the stomach is tense, just as the waistband and all that without excessive calorie intake.
can be, for example, a disturbed intestinal flora - because the type and quantity of the gases produced during the fermentation process depend to a large extent on the fermentation process bacteria involved. If our intestinal flora or our microbiome is in imbalance, the more gas-producing bacteria, such as proteo bacteria, may gain the upper hand. Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli, which tend to be less gas-producing, on the other hand, are the minority. In addition, a disturbed intestinal flora also shows a reduced bacterial diversity, meaning that certain food components are no longer sufficiently broken down and thus contribute to increased gas formation. Pathogens also have an easy job in a disturbed microbiome and often contribute to increased gas production, usually accompanied by additional intestinal complaints such as nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea.
If our intestinal flora or our microbiome is in imbalance , the more gas-producing bacteria, such as proteo bacteria , may gain the upper hand. Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli, which tend to be less gas-producing, then outnumber them. In addition, a disturbed intestinal flora also shows a reduced bacterial diversity. This can mean that certain food components are no longer sufficiently broken down and thus contribute to increased gas formation. Pathogens also have an easy job in a disturbed microbiome and often contribute to increased gas production, usually accompanied by additional intestinal complaints such as nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea.

And last but not least, the intake of antibiotics often leads to disturbances of the intestinal flora and consequently to flatulence, bloated stomach and others digestive problems.

and the solution?

... is quite obvious - the microbiome has to get back toits equilibrium . This can be achieved with the right diet, and the intake of nutritional supplements with natural intestinal bacteria, so-called probiotics. These valuable probiotic bacteria can help the intestinal flora back into equilibrium and can thus not only eliminate the symptoms (oops, a fart), but also the causes of irritable bowel syndrome. Dietary supplements with a large number of probiotic bacterial strains can help, with regular and long-term use, to shift the microbial ratio in the intestine in favor of the 'good' bacteria and thus alleviate or even eliminate symptoms.

Each capsule of our within® - food supplement contains 14 carefully selected bacterial strains with more than 10 billion bacteria. In stomach-resistant capsules, these get into your intestines without any loss of energy and can use all their valuable power there. With regular consumption they help balance your microbiome and let you forget unpleasant gas and other complaints.

Source:

Management of Chronic Abdominal Distension and Bloating
Brian E Lacy, David Cangemi, Maria Vazquez-Roque
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2021 Feb; 19 (2): 219-231

Probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 versus placebo for the symptoms of bloating in patients with functional bowel disorders: a double-blind study

Tamar Ringel-Kulka, Olafur S Palsson, Danielle Maier, Ian Carroll, Joseph A Galanko, Gregory Leyer, Yehuda Ringel

J Clin Gastroenterol. 2011 Jul; 45 (6): 518-25.
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